‘Save Yourselves!’ a welcome diversion

%27Save+Yourselves%21%27+a+welcome+diversion

Sophia Bailly, Editor in chief

With all of 2020’s undeniable chaos, “Save Yourselves!” a film that pokes fun at an alien invasion and the end of the world, proves to be surprisingly uplifting.

The film follows Su and Jack, a technology-obsessed couple from Brooklyn, who decide to take a week-long getaway to a cabin in the woods. The trip sounds like smooth sailing; but, the couple agrees to a technology detox, turning off their phones, tablets, computers and AI assistants. While there are plenty of humorous moments highlighting humanity’s reliance on technology — especially through the couple’s obvious lack of exposure to nature — the irony of the film is what brings the most laughter.

Starting out, I assumed “Save Yourselves!” intended to emphasize society’s need to disconnect from phones and reconnect with reality. But, in an ironic turn of events, Su and Jack’s vacation of tranquility and self-discovery is overturned by an alien invasion. An army of furry, eyeless monsters, which the couple refers to as “poofs,” are ravaging and destroying the urban world. And

with their phones turned

off, the couple is oblivious and defenseless. The film calls out technological addiction and upholds the importance of staying connected.

“Save Yourselves!” owes a bulk of its success to the undeniable chemistry between the lead characters. Su and Jack define what a pure dynamic duo should be, emulating yin and yang. Su is agenda-driven and stubborn, and her Type A personality makes her more real of a person. She doesn’t try to force herself into the “perfect female heroine” role. Instead, Su is simply human, with strengths, weaknesses, hopes and fears just like everyone else. Comparatively, Jack is much more of a Type B personality and takes pride in being more relaxed and easygoing. Jack is happy just to be himself, even if his abilities do not coincide with stereotypical “manliness.”

Character development is crucial to a strong movie. And within only 93 minutes, “Save Yourselves!” manages to bring out a more adventurous and powerful side to both characters.

The film also adds diversity, with Su, played by Sunita Mani, being of Indian heritage. While this may not seem revolutionary, there is not nearly enough Indian representation in the film. Hollywood sometimes casts minorities as side characters, but rarely as leads. “Save Yourselves!” is taking a step in the right direction. 

With all the undeniable chaos this year ushered into society, a film that pokes fun at an alien invasion and the end of the world was surprisingly uplifting. “Save Yourselves!” provides the apocalyptic comedy 2020 needed.

The film follows Su and Jack, a technology-obsessed couple from Brooklyn, who decide to take a week-long getaway to a cabin in the woods. The trip sounds like smooth sailing; but, the couple agrees to have a technology detox, and turn off their phones, tablets, computers and AI household assistants. While there are plenty of humorous moments in which the film highlights humanity’s reliance on technology – especially through the couple’s obvious lack of exposure to nature – the irony of the film is what brings the most laughter.

Starting out, I assumed “Save Yourselves!” intended to emphasize society’s need to disconnect from phones and reconnect with reality. But, in an ironic turn of events, Su and Jack’s vacation of tranquility and self-discovery is overturned by an alien invasion. An army of furry, eyeless monsters, which the couple refers to as “poofs,” are ravaging and destroying the urban world. And with their phones turned off, the couple is oblivious and defenseless. The film ultimately manages to call out technological addiction, while at the same time, upholds the importance of staying connected.

“Save Yourselves!” owes a bulk of its success to the undeniable chemistry between the lead characters. Su and Jack define what a pure dynamic duo should be, emulating yin and yang. Su is agenda-driven and stubborn, and her Type A personality makes her more real of a person. She doesn’t try to force herself into the “perfect female heroine” role. Instead, Su is simply human, with strengths, weaknesses, hopes and fears just like everyone else. Comparatively, Jack is much more of a Type B personality and takes pride in being more relaxed and easygoing. Instead of forcing Jack into an overly pronounced masculine role, he is happy just to be himself, even if his abilities do not coincide with stereotypical “manliness.” Character development is crucial to a strong movie. And within only 93 minutes, “Save Yourselves!” manages to bring out a more adventurous, and powerful side to both characters.

The film also adds diversity to the Hollywood industry, with Su, played by Sunita Mani, being of Indian heritage. While this may not seem like a revolutionary concept, there is not nearly enough Indian representation in the film industry. Occasionally, Hollywood will cast minorities as side characters, but rarely as the leading role. “Save Yourselves!” is taking a step in the right direction. 

The film is worth the watch, with enough action, suspense, humor and emotion to keep audiences interested. And as the world seems to come to an end, Su and Jack’s journey to safety is as comedically heroic as it is heartfelt.