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The Roar

The Student news source for West Shore Junior/Senior High School

The Roar

The Student news source for West Shore Junior/Senior High School

The Roar

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Mitski’s new album shows her musical range, talent

Mitskis new album shows her musical range, talent
Dead Oceans

Throughout her musical career, Mitski has explored various styles ranging from her eerie soft-alt debut album “Lush” to her ecstatic synth-pop album “Laurel Hell.” Her newest album, “The Land is Inhospitable and So Are We,” is no exception to her experimentation. While mostly similar to her older music, this album features country-pop tones that listeners aren’t used to hearing from Mitski. The opening track, “Bug Like an Angel,” features a 17-person choir hand-selected by Mitski. “As I got older, I learned I’m a drinker,” Mitski sings, reflecting on issues with alcohol — a different tone than that of her previous love-weary tracks such as “I Bet on Losing Dogs.”

Mitski describes the presence of alcohol as “family,” and the choir soon joins in to belt the word with her. The sudden addition of the chorus serves as a jumpscare in the middle of the song, which is an excellent example of Mitski’s eccentric approach to creating music. She often strays from the traditional structure of songs — intro, verse, chorus and bridge — and creates unique pieces of art that stick with her audience and effectively get her message across.

Mitski is well known for her cryptic songwriting, which is beautifully illustrated by the second track on the album. “Buffalo Replaced” feels more like an enigmatic piece of poetry than a song, similar to some of her pieces like “Last Words of a Shooting Star” and “A Burning Hill” from previous albums.

Dreamy melodies are paired with slightly disturbing lyrics as Mitski talks about the complexities of a changing world, describing it as a “freight train.” “My Love Mine All Mine” is the strongest track of the album by far, and it’s already receiving covers by talented artists such as Clairo. Only a little over two minutes long, Mitski tugs on the heartstrings
of her audience with the words “nothing in the world belongs to me but my love.” As she sings of her sorrowful experience with love, a slightly out-of-tune piano plays in the background, reminiscent of that which would be heard in an old-fashioned saloon. This ties into the western elements of the earlier track “Buffalo Replaced.”

This sound continues with “The Frost,” as the sound of slide guitar accompanies Mitski’s lyrics telling of a post-
apocalyptic world. “Heaven” is a pleasant love song featuring a breathtaking combination of soft drums and haunting cello. This theme is contrasted by “I Don’t Like My Mind,” a tranquil track accompanied by hopeless lyrics. “I don’t like my mind, I don’t like being alone in a room,” Mitski confesses to her audience. On her most raw track on the album Mitski’s vocals crescendo as she continues to pour out her feelings to her listeners. “The Deal” showcases
Mitski’s incredible storytelling and ends with a steady buildup of swift drums and lulling vocals. She tells her audience her tendency to ignore the past in “When Memories Snow” while an orchestra gives a powerful performance in the background.

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About the Contributor
Addyson Leathers, Staff Writer
I’m a junior, and this is my first year on the “Roar” staff. My favorite hobby is drawing, and I love to listen to music. My favorite genres are alt-rock and 2000’s pop punk, and my favorite bands are Taking Back Sunday, Fall Out Boy, Radiohead, and Muse.